Student Snippets A Window Into The Daily Life & Thoughts of SLIS Students

Samantha Quiñon

I am a Hispanic student in her second semester of the Archives Management concentration at SLIS Main Campus. I relocated to Boston from New Mexico over the summer and am enjoying having new experiences of all sorts in this big, diverse city I now call home. I have hospitality and gallery management backgrounds as well as archives volunteer experience. Changing careers and moving to an unfamiliar city far from home makes for notable and often amusing happenings. Please join me on my fun adventure.



Entries by Samantha Quiñon

  • A Bit About My Summer Classes

    As we head into the end of July, we at SLIS are entering the final week of the summer term. This is my second year taking summer classes, and they are a lot of work (classes are condensed), but worth it (six credits in six weeks). I definitely recommend them. This semester I took Collection Development (LIS 453) and Evaluation (LIS 403). Evaluation sounds vague, I know. It’s mostly about how to evaluate and assess various aspects of your library to meet user needs and justify funding, along with the various research and data collection methods that exist. The classes complemented each other well, as Collection Development had a large part devoted to evaluation of a library’s collection. I’m working on final projects for both courses now. For Evaluation, I have to write a research proposal including literature review, and for Collection Development I have to write a collection development policy with demographic data, budget allocation information, deselection guidelines, a gift policy, and collection priorities. (Mine is about 35 pages total, single-spaced, but that includes…

  • You Had Me At Diorama

    With classes starting this week, I’ve been running around checking things off of my “To Do In Boston” List. Two weekends ago, I walked the entire Freedom Trail with some friends. (It’s only about 2.5 miles long.) The weather was sunny and breezy, so it was the perfect time to take in the sights outdoors. We hit every stop! I was most impressed with the less touristy ones, like King’s Chapel and the Bunker Hill Monument, which commemorates an early battle in the Revolutionary War and is actually located on Breed’s Hill, where most of the combat took place. If you are walking the whole trail from end to end, you can either start at the State House or at the Bunker Hill Monument. We didn’t think we were going to see everything, so we started at the USS Constitution. Launched in 1797, it is the world’s oldest commissioned naval vessel still afloat (even though it’s temporarily in dry dock). My friend Nick had been there on a tour with the New England Archivists (NEA)…

  • Summertime Gladness

    So lately I’ve been blogging about jobs and work and all things professional. A lot of this is because I finally feel like I know what I’m doing to a certain extent. Yay for me, but let’s talk about something more interesting, namely how many more opportunities there are for fun and socializing during the break between the summer and spring semesters (and any of the semesters). This is when SLIS students have more time to spend with their friends to hang out, have get-togethers, see the sights, etc. I’m especially grateful for the time I have now to finally grab a drink or get a cup of coffee with friends I haven’t seen in months. Before, maybe we’d grab a quick coffee at school and use that time to talk about how we were too busy to get a simple cup of coffee. Now we can talk about anything really. We can even have TWO cups of coffee. Whoa, right? Talk about living it up. I had a very enjoyable Saturday last week in…

  • Two Jobs and Three Clasps

    This past week I started two new jobs. Well one is not that new, it’s the same library assistant position I had during the Spring Semester, but now my hours have been doubled and I have a few new responsibilities. As I write this, it is Memorial Day Weekend, and for the first time, I’m the senior staff person on duty. No managers today; no one will bail me out or make a tough decision for me if there is any sort of incident. It’s really not a big deal on a slow weekend like this, but it’s nice to know my managers think I’m competent enough to handle things. I also was invited to co-author a libguide with another librarian, which is basically a set of webpages with useful resources and for patrons on a specific subject. Many jobs I’m interested in applying for after graduation prefer applicants with experience in patron instruction and creating digital resources, so I’m excited to be able to eventually put this on my résumé. The other new position…

  • Take Me Out to the Ball Game

    Even though I’ve been living in Boston for almost a year now, I have yet experience and do many things that are quintessentially “Boston”, which is to say touristy in the best possible way. So I have made a list of things that I want to do this summer, including walking the Freedom Trail, taking a Duck Tour, walking around the Public Garden, and going to the North End for Italian food.  On Wednesday, I had the opportunity to start crossing off things on my list early by going to a Red Sox game. I went with my boyfriend and his friends to a night game at Fenway Park where we drank and ate overpriced park food and beverages, sang along to “Take Me Out to the Ball Game”, watched a proposal on the JumboTron, bopped around in our seats to cheesy walk-up songs, and saw the Green Monster/Monstah (the legendary left field wall) in person. Attending classes at the main campus means that I’m constantly in the heart of the Fenway, just blocks from the stadium. While I’m often…

  • Website Launch and Other Odds and Ends

     Last week at my cataloging internship at the American Archive for Public Broadcasting (AAPB) at WGBH Boston, our website launched and went live. This has been a long time coming and many, many people worked very hard to make this happen, so I wanted to take a minute and share it with you. Understandably, we had a party at lunch. I basically only ate cake and powered through the afternoon on a sugar high from the excellent buttercream frosting. Here’s a link to the AAPB, so you can see the results and learn more about the project I’m working on: http://americanarchive.org/. This week was busy, but I managed to break my routine a few times. First on Tuesday, I went to happy hour at a near by bar called the Squealing Pig. The event was sponsored by the SLIS Student Chapter of the Society of American Archivists (SCoSSA), and there was all sorts of good food and good company. It was a nice mid-week break. Later in the week, I had an interview for an…

  • Girls Wanna be with the Girls

    We have two weeks left in the spring semester. Two weeks! But is that going to keep my friends and me from going out when we have course work and final projects looming over us? Absolutely not! I’ll keep this brief, because now that I’ve spent all of today procrastinating my work, I should probably start doing it. (Well, I probably should have started doing it at the beginning of the term, as recommended, but it’s too late now.) Here was our day in pictures: Brunch at Scollay Square. Evidence of cocktails omitted. Me and fellow SLIS student Amanda Baker, Massachusetts State House in the background. Photo courtesy of Samantha Quiñon, all rights reserved, 2015. SLIS student Christina Benedictus “shooting the duck” on Boston Common. Photo courtesy of Meaghan Kinton, all rights reserved, 2015#shoottheduckrevolution And then we went to the movies and saw The Longest Ride, but really we just went to look at Scott Eastwood. He’s a good actor, okay? Meme by Sara Davis.  

  • At the Dance Archives

    For a few hours every Thursday I have started to go to the archives of Jose Mateo Ballet Theatre (JMBT), which has its facilities in the Old Cambridge Baptist Church, a beautiful field stone building in the American Gothic Revival style just off of Harvard Square. There, two other SLIS students and I are taking an inventory before processing the collections, as part of a grant-funded project to process the archives of many of Cambridge’s dance companies. Two weeks ago, my first time seeing the JMBT archives, I knew our goal was ambitious. The collections comprise everything from institutional records, to costumes and props, to old promotional material and performance recordings. They are crammed into four large rooms in different parts of the church, much like I imagine industrial-sized, hastily packed storage lockers to be (if such things exist). Battling through the dust and teetering piles of boxes, we have to move records around Tetris style to wind our way from item to item before noting it in our spreadsheet. Admittedly, this style of inventory…

  • Online Classes and Group Projects

    Many bloggers on this site, myself included, have written about how group projects and teamwork are the bedrock of many SLIS courses. But what if you are taking a class online? Does that change? Not at all. Online students do just as much group work as face-to-face students, except sometimes they have to get more creative to accomplish their goals and finish projects. This semester I am taking Metadata (LIS-445OL) online. A good friend of mine took it in person with the same professor in the fall. After the class got started, I showed him the syllabus and asked if he saw any major differences between the work for the face-to-face class and the work for the online one. He said the professor used different examples for some exercises, but that all the assignments and modules were the same, and I was happy to hear this. At the beginning of the semester, I worked with my group to compare our individual work against each other’s. This ensured we were all taking away the same lessons…

  • The Myth of Spring Break

    Only after experiencing this week, the first week back at SLIS after Spring Break, can I now fully express why Spring Break is a myth. As an adult in graduate school, I was not expecting beaches and cocktails with umbrellas in them, but I was looking forward to some sort of respite. Here’s why that didn’t happen: Boston broke the record for most snow in a winter that week. And then the weather was great long enough for me to wear non-construction worker boots for all of a day for the first time in months before I had to ditch the cute shoes. All of my friends were either out of town or took a five-day short course on corporate library management, so I couldn’t really socialize with anyone. I still had to go to work and my internship. I had a paper due over the break for one class and another group assignment due two days after. Everyone acted like I should have been very rested and refreshed this week, when the only difference…

  • First Fridays

    My friends and I have a sort of tradition, though I don’t know if that’s really the proper word. Maybe it’s habit or ritual or pattern. Anyway, I’m talking about how we always congregate monthly at the Museum of Fine Arts (MFA) for its “First Fridays” event, which happens on the evening of –you guessed it– the first Friday of every month. We do this for many reasons. First of all, the MFA is beautiful, and it’s a completely different experience seeing it lit up at night. It’s also only about two blocks from the main campus, so the location is convenient. Additionally, we all get in for free with our Simmons student IDs. (This is also true at the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum, which is literally right next door.) Just to reiterate: We have an amazing museum nearby open late with plenty to explore and free admission. If those aren’t enough reasons to go, the event also sells drinks for a reasonable price (rare in Boston) and has a tasty assortment of light snacks….

  • Thoughts of Summer

    This week I registered for summer classes and applied for a summer internship. I could hardly believe it. Summer seems so far off, especially given the amount of snow on the ground now, but it’s better to plan for it now than to be caught unprepared later. As for classes, after much vacillation, I decided to take courses in XML, digital stewardship, and digital humanities. It is all very technology oriented. A year ago if you had told me I would focus on something like this for a career, I would have told you that you were out of your mind. It is really challenging, but I’m passionate about making information available and discoverable for everyone. That’s why concentrating on digital repositories seems like a good choice for me. The choice also fits very well the professional and internship experience I have. It’s tough, because I feel like my level of skill with technology isn’t as advanced as a lot of other students’, but I think I can overcome my deficiencies and learn more given…

  • Forced Fun and Productivity

    Okay. So you’ve heard by now how much snow we’ve had in Boston. Living here, it’s hard to forget, but I’m trying. Everyone is trying. Here’s what I’ve been doing to make the time go by: School Work: Writing an XML schema Reading for classes Writing critiques of the aforementioned readings Gradually making a strategic plan for Emory University Archives for a group project Things Usually Procrastinate: Doing my taxes Filing my financial aid forms Laundry Cleaning stuff that will eventually get dirty again (i.e. everything) Writing thoughtful replies to e-mails (i.e. more than “Thanks” and “Will do”) Fun Distractions and Outings: Going to a Mexican food restaurant without windows to pretend I wasn’t in Boston Many movie nights (courtesy of DVDs from various libraries) Binge watching The Killing on Netflix Tweeting stuff no one cares about Perfecting the art of making warm cocktails (Hot Toddy anyone?) Reading Lisa Genova’s Still Alice (which is so good!) Somewhere in here I also managed to go to work and my internship after dealing with long commutes, but…

  • Blizzard Books

    If you are inclined to get carried away with the spirit of Snowmageddon 2015, below I offer you suggestions for books to read while you’re hunkered down in this mess or while you’re hearing about it on the news from far away (lucky you!). In retrospect, perhaps I should have complied a list of beach reads instead. Oh well. Here it goes: Blankets by Craig Thomason- The black and white artwork in this graphic novel makes the snow it depicts intense in contrast with the rest of the drawings. Set in the 90s during a heavy winter in the Midwest, this tale of young love will make you want to snuggle with someone to keep warm. https://mirrorsofchrist.wordpress.com/2012/10/01/44-blankets-by-craig-thompson/ Simila’s Sense of Snow by Peter Hoeg- Secrets wait beneath the ice in this dark crime thriller that takes place in Denmark and Greenland. Simila, the protagonist, will make you re-consider the very structure of snow itself and all the trails you leave behind in it as she tracks down a child’s murderer. Snowpiercer (both volumes) by Jaques…

  • Snowpocalypse and the Brunch Bunch

    I survived “Snowpocalypse” (as work called it)! Clearly, librarians love melodrama. It was my first blizzard in New England, and I actually kind of liked it. I walked around in the back yard in the middle of it, and it was so quiet that it didn’t feel like I was in Boston at all, more like I was on vacation in some winter wonderland. The only real trouble was AFTER the storm. No one knew where to put all the snow, so pedestrians couldn’t walk on un-shoveled sidewalks and a lot of streets were only one lane even after being plowed. So commuting was a nightmare all around, for drivers and public transportation users. I waited an hour for a bus that never came and another 40 minutes for the T and by that time I was running so late that I hailed a cab, so it cost me more money to get to work than I actually made that day. On the bright side, I had brunch with some friends the Sunday before the…

  • So it Begins

    There is not much to say this week. Classes started, and work and my internship continued. Reading through my course syllabi and writing all the due dates for each class’s papers and presentations into my planner next to my work hours, suddenly the new semester became real. Seeing everything on paper like that made it click, so to speak, in my brain. Apart from being overwhelming, there were also a lot of good moments in my week where I got to catch up with peers whom I hadn’t seen since last semester. Now that I’m further along in my program, it’s pleasant to be in courses with people I’ve gotten to know in previous semesters, either through classes or student groups. A lot of my projects involve group work, so it’s nice to be able to eliminate the anxiety I felt in the past over not knowing who would make a good teammate. In retrospect, I can say that previous anxiety was entirely unfounded. I think one of my favorite parts of SLIS and information…

  • What’s in Store

    I started a job last week at the Snell Library at Northeastern University. It’s in the Circulation Department (called Access Services there) supervising work-study students at the information desk, doing interlibrary loans (ILLs) and working with reserves, and a variety of other basic things. I think it’s a great way to get my feet wet at a large, academic, research library. I also started my cataloging internship at WGBH at the American Archive of Public Broadcasting. Unlike at Snell, I feel really confident about what I’m doing here. I have experience with digital collections and metadata from my internship last fall at Emerson College’s digital archives. I’m sure I’ll catch on and feel right at home at my other job soon though. Classes start next week. I’m taking Principles of Management (LIS 404 with Mónica Colón-Aguirre who could read the phone book and make it interesting), Subject Cataloging and Classification (LIS 417 with Danny Joudrey who literally wrote the book–the textbook–for Organization of Information, LIS 415), and Metadata online (LIS 445-OL with Kathy Wisser who…

  • Holiday in Summary and a Return to Boston

    This year was my first Christmas at my family’s home in Florida while in library school. Holidays are about more than gifts, but I am going to talk about them anyway, because I was surprised by how many were book-themed. There were book ornaments, books drawn on PJs, book-print socks, a mug with lines from famous books, actual books (of course), and more. It’s strange having this new identity, which I don’t mind, but it’s definitely odd. I’m the same person I’ve always been. I’ve always loved books. No one gave me anything book-related when I majored in English literature for my undergraduate degree, and that actually had a lot more to do with books. I guess people are always happy to find another way to relate to someone as a way of showing love and support, and libraries and books are something everyone understands and has experienced. Beyond being slightly puzzled, I’m grateful that my family seems genuinely happy to see me start a new part of my life and cares enough to bond…

  • Takin’ Care of Business

    Good news! I have a cataloging internship for the spring (January-May 2015). It’s at WGBH (a Boston TV and radio station that produces two thirds of the country’s public broadcasting, like Masterpiece Theater, Antiques Road Show, and Frontline) at the American Archive of Public Broadcasting (AAPB). Besides cataloguing, I’m going to contribute to their blog and sit on an advisory sub-committee for PBCore (Public Broadcasting Core), the metadata schema the archive is using and developing for audiovisual material. I’m really excited. It’s been tough for me to find a cataloguing internship in the Boston area. The internship isn’t paid, so I need another way to make money. Fortunately, I was able to schedule two of my classes on the same day and one over Spring Break, so I have a flexible schedule to accommodate work. I’ve been applying for a lot of jobs, and I have interviews for three. Two are at local education institutions, one is at a museum, and they all are at libraries. Most of the employers that want to interview me…

  • Free Time

    This week was blissfully uneventful. Mostly, I stuck to my routine. I had class (for the last time this year), volunteered in the library at the Boston Arts Academy, and finished my internship. Things happened that were outside of my routine too. I interviewed for jobs and internships for the new year, which was both stressful and exciting. (I won’t tell you which ones, because I don’t want to jinx it.) I also went to a holiday party at my friend Meaghan’s apartment and went to the movies and out for dinner with my roommate to celebrate the end of the school year. On a more productive note, with all my newfound free time, I ran dozens of errands I’ve been procrastinating, so my eyebrows now don’t resemble Frida Kahlo’s and my wardrobe is newly expanded with clothes I finally got dry-cleaned. On top of that, I checked out a lot of books from Beatley Library (Simmons College Library) to read over the break. Currently, I’m in the middle of The Night Circus, a fantasy…

  • That’s All, Folks! (For Now)

    I’m finished!!! I turned in all of my work for the Fall term and did all of my presentations. I think everything went well, but I won’t know until I get my grades in a few weeks. Technically, I still have one more week of class for LIS 407 (Reference), but since I gave my presentation last week, I can basically just show up in my pajamas and kick back while other people get stressed out. I won’t, but I am enjoying that I could, hypothetically speaking. My presentation last week, which I gave with four other people, lasted forty minutes and was about PubMed, which is a public medical database run by the National Library of Medicine. A small percentage of our grade depended on how professionally we were dressed during our time in front of the class, so it was pleasantly unusual to see everyone looking so nice. It’s not that people in the program are slobs or anything, but around this time of the year, everyone is looking at their laptop and…

  • The Next Step

    I’m still mired down in final projects and papers, so it while it feels like last week moved very slowly, I oddly remember very little of it. One momentous thing does stand out, however. Remember a few weeks ago when I contemplating switching out of the Archives program only to decide to stay in it? Well, this week I ended up switching out of it after all. That’s right– I’m on the general track now! It’s scary to change the course of my life and career like this, and a little sad too. These feelings are understandable, because I’m giving something up, but that change also allows me to make room for something that’s a better fit for me. Ultimately, my decision came down to where I saw myself being happier to work every day. During my internship at the Emerson College Digital Archives, I realized how much I missed working, serving, and interacting with people. I have a strong background in hospitality. Actually, I thought it traumatized me and scared me away from wanting…

  • The Home Stretch

    Classes end the first or second week of December (depending on whether or not the class started in the first or second week of September). This generally means that SLIS students are working on a final project for every class right about now. This isn’t like undergrad. There is no big final examination. It’s intense. For one class I have to build a working website with five HTML pages and use CSS manipulation, which I’m sure is no big deal for some people, but it’s a huge deal for me. For another class (Reference), I have to work with a group of four other people to create a 40-minute tutorial for a medical database called PubMed. I’m gearing up by watching video guides that PubMed currently has posted on its website. The shortest one is an hour, and it covers just one aspect of the site. It’s going to be interesting to see how we condense all of this information into a manageable, cogent presentation. I also have a literature review due for my archives…

  • A Bit More Fit

    This week I activated my Fitbit Zip, which is like a souped up pedometer that tracks steps, distance, and calories burned. I’m trying to walk 10,000 steps a day, but it’s been more like 8,000, if I’m being honest–which I am. And it’s not like I can lie, because many of my friends have Fitbit too. There is a social feature where we can see how many steps other people in our network have taken, so I’m accountable to other people, not just myself. Everyone’s total number of steps is automatically calculated for the week, and we try to see who can take the most. This has lead to a lot good-natured goading. It’s great motivation, because I’m pretty competitive, and we’re all eager to walk off all the junk food we’ve eaten now that we’re in the second (more intense) half of the Fall term. So for now 8,000 steps a day is acceptable. After all, it’s only my first week, and school, studying, and archives work are usually sedentary activities. Still, it’s pretty…

  • Massachusetts Historical Society Visit

    On Thursday night, my Introduction to Archival Methods and Services (LIS 438) class visited the Massachusetts Historical Society. Founded in 1791, the society is an independent research library open to the public that specializes in early American, Massachusetts, and New England historical documents. Before our visit even began, most of our class walked together from Simmons to the historical society, which is a little less than a mile away. It was (finally) one of those classic New England brisk fall evenings outside, and we walked over bright, damp leaves as everyone chatted and observed the omnipresent geese. When we arrived, Director of Collection Services Brenda Lawson gave a short talk to welcome and orient us. She told our class that she too went on a tour of the historical society with her archives class when she was getting her MSLIS at Simmons over 25 years ago. Then, carrying out a long-running tradition, we broke into three groups and took a two-hour tour. We saw all the essential parts of the repository, like the processing room,…

  • Small victories this week

    Making an Important Decision I’m staying in the archives concentration after a little internal debate about whether or not to study something more general. I can’t do everything I may love, so I’ll do one thing I’m certain I love. I’m really passionate about people accessing and using archives, so I’ll find a way to do something with that. Having this decided brings me a little peace of mind, especially for selecting my Spring courses during registration next week. Getting a Flu Shot I got a free flu shot on a break between classes in the Main College Building near the Fens Café. I love how Simmons uses its students in nursing school to administer the vaccines. They get to practice their new skills, and everyone else gets to not be in agony this winter. It took literally three minutes from filling out a piece of paper to getting the vaccination in my left arm, which is still a little sore when I try to lift my backpack which weighs a ton. It’s like Hermione’s…

  • What Everyone Is Talking About

    The schedule of Spring 2015 classes came out this week, and for a while, it was all anyone could talk about. I still walk through the halls and overhear conversations about it. Generally, people are excited or stressed about it. It’s exciting because we can look ahead and see ourselves moving forward in the program, but with all of our options at SLIS, that can simultaneously be a bit anxiety provoking. I’ve stayed really close with three other people with whom I had classes over the summer. We all started during that term and were all archives concentrators with the same SLIS academic advisor. Also, we were in class 12 hours a week together and worked collaboratively on many group projects, which is a good way to get to know one another. (Summer schedule is 6 hours a week for six weeks per class with a maximum of 6 total credits, instead of the usual 3 hours a week for 12-13 weeks per class with a maximum of 9 total credits.) Now, after two classes…

  • Myths about SLIS and Library School

    Myth: I’m going to have a tough time getting a job when I graduate. Truth: You aren’t going to graduate from SLIS and become director of the New York Public Library, but you are going to graduate and find employment. If you are willing to re-locate outside of Boston, you definitely won’t have problems finding a job. If you continue to live in Boston or have a specialty (like art or law librarianship), you will still get a job, but you might either have to wait for a few months or work in something that isn’t your preferred specialty, until you can find exactly what you want. When people outside of the field joke that no one needs librarians anymore with Google and the Internet, they fail to account for the resurgence in library hiring since the recession and for non-traditional librarian jobs. As I’ve mentioned in my prior posts, SLIS’s Simmons Jobline is constantly being updated with new positions in all of the information sciences at every level (student, pre-professional, and professional). Also, many…

  • Schedule Update

    My schedule changed this week and became much more busy thanks to two new jobs of sorts. The first is an internship at Emerson College, and the second is a volunteer position at Boston Arts Academy/Fenway High School. The internship is required for my Archival Methods and Services (LIS 438) class. For eight hours a week (on Monday in my case) through the first or second week of December, students in this class must attend an internship at a local repository where they learn about the basics of archives. The internship lets me and my classmates see what archivists do on a daily basis by allowing us to both observe and complete nitty-gritty, time-consuming (and highly edifying) tasks that are perfect for students. Doing these jobs will provide us with skills to complete a final project at the internship, which will comprise a significant portion of our grade. My internship, in Emerson’s digital archives at the Iwasaki Library, has me processing a small digital collection of alumni weekend photographs and creating a finding aid for…

  • ASIS&T Trivia Night

    There are so many student groups to get involved with at SLIS. If you have an interest or professional aspiration, chances are good you can find a group connected to it. (A list of student groups and their descriptions can be found here.) All SLIS students pay an activities fee each term. Part of the fee is given to LISSA (Library and Information Science Student Association), of which all students are automatically members. LISSA then disburses this money across all student organizations according to the budget each group has been allotted. This arrangement has many benefits. For one, you don’t have to pay dues to any of the SLIS student groups, and since your activity fee goes towards all of them, you are eligible to join any and as many as you’d like. Another fun part of this is that you can attend any event or meeting a student organization is having without having to be part of the group. For example, I’m going on a free guided tour of the Boston Museum of Fine…

  • Field Study at BPL

    I have to do a field study for my Archival Methods and Services (LIS 438) class, which entails visiting a local repository, using it to answer a research question, and then writing a 3-5 page paper about the experience. In the past I’ve mostly used small, community archives, so for a change of pace, I chose to visit the large and impressive print department of Boston Public Library’s Special Collections. The entrance to BPL Before I could visit, I had to come up with a research question. Since I didn’t know what collections the department housed, I went online to its website (BPL Special Collections) to get an overview of what it had. Even though only a tiny part of the vast Special Collections has been digitized, BPL still does an exemplary job of listing what it has available for researchers and the general public. But with so much selection, it was a little overwhelming! I ended up picking the Adlow papers, a collection of late 18th and early 19th century documents that belonged to…

  • Dissecting Computers

    I blog and I’m in library school, so sometimes people think I know a lot about computers. While I can understand why they would make this assumption, to be perfectly honest, technology really intimidates me. This goes back to a when I was in the second grade and my family got a new peripheral device and remote control for our cable television. There were so many colorful buttons! I started pushing away at them, trying to find the guide channel. As result, the TV froze and would not turn back on. It took two days to get someone from the cable company to reset everything, and by the time it was all over, I had a fear of touching expensive machines and always tried to get other people to handle technology for me. My first personal computer? My boyfriend set it up. My first iPod? My brother put all of my music on it and on every iPod I’ve owned since. When I moved away from home for the first time? My boyfriend at the…