Student Snippets A Window Into The Daily Life & Thoughts of SLIS Students

Boston

How Running a Marathon is (sort of) Like Attending Simmons GSLIS

I want to make the Boston Marathon relevant to GSLIS. I really do. “Library school is like a marathon.” “The last two weeks of the semester are the final sprint to complete a marathon.” “The Boston Marathon is awesome, and so is GSLIS.” As much as I enjoy figurative language, those statements just don’t quite get it done. I couldn’t watch the Boston Marathon last year, but two years ago it was one of the most inspiring things I have ever witnessed. Despite being a certified stoic, at one point I found myself holding back tears. The combination of beautiful weather, everyone’s positive energy, and the camaraderie among the runners and spectators created an experience that I will not soon forget. There is something overpowering about watching 27,000 people meander 26.2 miles from Framingham to Downtown Boston. A marathon is hardly about winning in the traditional sense. Everyone out there, whether on the course or alongside it, wants every single marathoner to succeed. In a marathon, to succeed is to finish and to finish is…


The Suburbs

One of the benefits of going to school in a city like Boston is that, aside from everything you’ll be doing in school, the city itself has plenty to offer.  I completed my undergraduate school at a tiny university in central Pennsylvania—Shippensburg University, to be exact.  And even though I loved the school, the faculty, and my experience there, the best thing the town had to offer were fields of corn and cows.  Sure, my friends and I frequently made trips to D.C., Baltimore, and Philadelphia to see shows, etc., but that usually meant at least a 1 1/2  to 2 hour commute one way. Boston is much more expensive than middle-of-nowhere Pennsylvania (my roommates and I shared an apartment and only paid $125 a month each in PA), but it’s justifiable in the end.  In a few weeks, PAX (a huge video game convention) will be coming to Boston.  I’ve already registered and am totally looking forward to it!  Sometimes  I do find myself missing green things and a little bit of nature, but…


Spring is here…sort of

Forgive the tangent from more scholarly, library-centric posts, but I would be remiss in my duties as a blogger for the Admissions Office if I did not comment upon the weather in Boston.   You see, before I moved to Boston, I knew that it got a lot of snow.  This seemed self-evident – we are, after all, living in New England.   What I didn’t know is that Boston is very much a “four seasons in a day” kind of place, though usually the changes are spread over the course of one day to the next. Take this past week, for example.  Last weekend brought with it the time change, clocks going forward an hour, giving us extra daylight at the day’s end.  This is a welcome change even if it does result in lost sleep because it means instead of getting dark at 5:30 (now – in the depths of winter, it’s pitch black by 5:00), it’s now dusk until somewhere around 6:30.   The beginning of the week brought the most extraordinarily gorgeous weather, the…


The Big Move (Part 2)

To continue my account of my move to Boston, I’m here this week with the second installment of “The Big Move.”  I left off last week setting myself up for quite a task, which is to tell my stories and offer some tips regarding finding a place to live in Boston and using public transportation.  In the interest of not overwhelming you with a term-paper length piece, I’m going to back off from that and stick to discussing housing only and saving the wondrous MBTA for another week. One of the most intimidating elements of my planning phase leading up to moving to Boston was trying to find a place to live.  I was living in Missouri at this time, and I didn’t have the means or the time to schedule a trip to Boston to look at apartments in person.  In fact, I didn’t travel to Boston at all until it was time to move.  This means I was 100% reliant upon this good ol’ Web of ours in my apartment hunt. I began,…


The Big Move (Part 1)

I want to take some time this week to tell the story of my move to Boston and hopefully offer some advice to anyone who is thinking about attending Simmons College but is a little worried about arranging to come here from somewhere outside of the New England area.  There are definitely special difficulties associated with a situation like this and many questions come up for people who want to move here but don’t know a lot about Boston.  Hopefully this post will address some of your concerns! I grew up in St. Louis, Missouri and went to undergrad in the same state, and up until this year, I had never had any “big move” kind of experience.  After I decided to attend Simmons, I was faced with a great deal of uncertainty.  When should I move?  How should I move?  Where should I live?  How will I find housing?  How should I get around when I get there?  I’m going to structure the rest of this post by quickly explaining how I addressed these…


New Bloggers and Posts On Their Way!

  As you can see, besides Jason’s post last week, it’s been a little while since we’ve had some regular bloggers on here. Sorry for our lapse! But, I promise to bring you some new reading in the coming weeks. I thought I’d get things started for now, but rest assured, there will be new posts to read and topics to discuss on a regular basis! My name is Katie Sallade, and I started attending GSLIS in the fall. I’m enrolled in the Archives dual-degree program with History and Library Science. The transition has been great thus far, although it definitely was not the easiest move I’ve made in my life. I’m from Harrisburg, PA, so it took about seven hours to drive to Boston and then the unpacking and such began. But the hardest part was actually finding a place to live. I opted to live off-campus in the hopes of feeling less like an undergrad and more like an independent woman. I had a housing situation lined up and then one of the…


GSLIS Mixer and Trivia

On Friday LISSA (Library and Information Science Student Association) had a GSLIS Mixer and Trivia night at the Bell in Hand Tavern here in Boston. LISSA is a student group you are automatically entered in once you start here at Simmons GSLIS and they plan different types of events, everything from Guest Speakers to Trivia nights. Let’s just state that my group had the best name of the night. I had some pretty funny names (being somewhat of a trivia connoisseur) but we decided to go with “This is how we Dewey it” (which I thought was weak to my other suggestion: “Junk in the truncation” [which is hysterical I might add]) but majority rules and we went with Dewey. Clearly we won the name contest. Then the trivia began. What do you ask a bunch of Library Science students you ask? Oh just some facts about Libraries/Librarians. The first round asked pop culture related questions. One such example is the quote: “Look, I… I may not be an explorer, or an adventurer, or a…


Walkin’ in a winter wonderland

I commute to school and work on the T and/or the bus. This means some walking and standing around waiting for a bus or T in the elements, while carrying around my daily essentials: coffee, water, food, reading materials for school and for fun, and sometimes my gym clothes.  And as my fellow bloggers have all mentioned, we’ve been getting crazy amounts of snow lately.  If you plan on commuting too, you might want to think about investing in a few things to get you through the snowy, slushy wonderland. 1) You’re gonna need a good, waterproof backpack. Not a shoulder bag. Shoulder bags are fine when the weather’s warmer or when there isn’t any slush, snow, or ice on the ground, but on a snowy day it just becomes something else that might throw you off balance. A good backpack with lots of compartments, including those side mesh pockets for easy access to your water bottle or coffee mug, has worked really well for me. 2) Good waterproof boots with textured soles. Uggs are…


This Southern girl is out of her element

I just got back from winter vacation last week, and while I am so happy to be in beautiful Boston again the weather is testing my courage and endurance. When I left for the (what I hoped would be) warm, sunny climes of Athens, GA over a month ago it had not yet snowed here. The roads and sidewalks were still dry and ice-free and I could still prance around without fear of slipping. The city was all decked out in lights and it hadn’t gotten very cold yet. I was in great spirits and I got home expecting a nice, warm, green Georgia Christmas. Instead, my hometown got three inches of snow on December 25 (three inches is a BIG deal down there!), only the second time in Athens’s recorded history that it had snowed on Christmas (the first time was in 1993). It was Atlanta’s first white Christmas since 1882 when Chester Arthur was president. We were all very excited to see the snow – we built snowmen, threw snowballs at each other,…


It’s colder than the Arctic Circle – but not for long.

Yes, really…Jason’s post last week was not that far off-base in terms of weather in Boston this winter. This morning Boston.com reported that the temperature in the city at 8:00AM (-2 degrees Fahrenheit) was colder than at the same time in Murmansk, Russia, the northernmost city in the Arctic Circle (6 degrees Fahrenheit). That’s chilly no matter which city you happened to be in at the time! That said, Boston is not ALWAYS this cold, nor does it (thankfully) stay this cold for long.  As of this time tomorrow we’ll be enjoying temps in the mid-thirties, a welcome change. Weather like this tests your patience but mostly it gives you a good story to tell in the future – and I’m sure everyone has heard rumors about hearty New Englanders (“I trudged 8 miles to school in the snow, uphill both ways…”). While I certainly never had to walk 8 miles to school, I’ve lived here all my life and temperatures like this come along only rarely. In the meantime, I’m surviving by watching for…